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20130201
20130228
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KQEH (PBS) 16
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. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also b
. using company documents to bolster their case, justice department lawyers says the deal will lead to higher prices for popular beers like budweiser and corona. anheuser-busch inbev says it is still confident the deal will go through. as darren gersh reports, the fight could be a sign more mergers will face a tougher time in washington. >> reporter: the justice department is not quite ready for a two-pack of brewers to control almost half the american beer market. in a statement announcing a lawsuit to block anheuser-bush inbev's $20 billion deal for mexican brewer modelo, assistant attorney general bill baer says >> if abi fully owned and controlled modelo, a.b.i. would be able to increase beer prices to american consumers. this lawsuit seeks to prevent a.b.i. from eliminating modelo as an important competitive force in the beer industry. anheuser-busch was not deterred, saying: >> we remain confident in our position, and we intend to vigorously contest the justice department's action in federal court. >> reporter: the proposed merger between the largest and third largest beer mak
those retail numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today app
.e.o. tim cook sheds little light on how the company plans to use its hoard of cash. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! for the second day in a row, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke told congress the central bank is not about to change its strategy, and for a second day, a strong rally on wall street. the dow surged 175 points to a five year high, the nasdaq added 32, the s&p was up 19 points. investors and traders warmed to the federal reserve chairman's steadfast support of the central bank's bond buying spree, he thinks the asset purchases are necessary to keep interest rates low in order to spur growth and boost hiring. the fed has been buying $85 billion a month in american i.o.u.'s since last september. while it won't stop the strategy, it will soon start talking about how to stop. >> we haven't done a new review of the exit strategy yet. i think we will have to do that sometime soon. even if we don't sell any securities, it doesn't mean that our balance sheet is going to be large for many years, it just would be maybe an extra year, that's all it would take to get down to a mor
, wall street could use some new headlines to chew on. good economic data would be nice. friendly washington politics would also be helpful. tonight's state of the union speech might give investors a clue as to whether that's likely to happen. veteran trader teddy weissberg is hoping president obama will stress the need for bipartisanship but isn't sure that's what he'll hear. >> in terms of tonight, i don't think anybody that i talk to in the wall street arena expects to hear anything terribly dramatic one way or another. >> reporter: since lawmakers and the white house kicked the proverbial can down the road around new years, the stock market has rallied rather nicely. the s&p 500 is up nearly 7% and the dow is about 150 points away from its all-time high. of course, stocks have been getting help from corporate america, too. it turns out fourth quarter profits were better than expected, led by the housing sector and financial firms. >> about 345 companies have reported so far, of which 70% have beaten earnings expectations and 66% have beaten revenue expectations. both of these
in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: on the comeback trail, hewlett packard posting better than expected first quarter results tonight, as a wide- ranging revamp of the struggling computer maker takes hold. and its shares take flight, rising over 6% in after hours trading. h.p. earned $0.82 a share, $0.11 better than wall street had anticipated. and revenues, while down at $28.4 billion, also beat the street. c.e.o. meg whitman has been on the job 17 months, speaking with investors today, whitman said she felt good about the rest of the year, and that last year's hard work was paying off for h.p. but, analysts say h.p. is not out of the woods yet. >> it's the type of thing that can be fixed quickly. this isn't going to take several years to play out so first of all it seems like meck whitman's vision is very much on track but we're not seeing that play out in the financials, but it is encouraging that guidance wa
. the u.s. airways/american airlines merger is ready for take-off, and the companies say they see no turbulence ahead from washington regulators. and senate democrats offer their plan to head off the sequester's sharp spending cuts. we get the details from michigan senator debbie stabenow. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r." two big sweetheart deals on this valentine's day: american airlines is merging with u.s. airways, creating the world's largest airline company; and warren buffett is buying h.j. heinz, the biggest food company acquisition ever. we'll have more on american in a moment, but we begin tonight with buffett and that surprising mega-food deal. the billionaire investor is teaming up with the billionaire owners of 3g capital to buy the ketchup maker for $28 billion. the private equity group and buffett's berkshire hathaway are paying $72.50 a share in cash. that's a 20% premium over heinz's closing price yesterday. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: the oracle of omaha now has a new title: ketchup king. for the first time, warren buffett, who's shied away from w
. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance ministers and central bankers are meeting in moscow over the weekend. they will be debating the need for austerity, versus the need to spur growth. no one expects a quick turnaround for the european economy, which has been mired in recession. but as erika miller reports, that may make now a good time to invest. >> reporter: it would makes sense that american investors would be loading up on u.s. stocks with the market here doing so well. but they're not. last week, investors in stock mutual funds put virtually all their cash in international markets. more than $3 billion went into funds holding international stocks. by comparison, mutual funds holding u.s. stocks suffered their first outflows of the year. investment advisors say small investors may be on to something. >> international investing has had a bad reputation over the last couple of years had a bad experience, people have taken money ou
industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is going to try to capture those markets. >> they want to continue to be a hardware player, but the questio
its easy efforts to stimulate the economy had u.s. markets seeing green. the dow gained 116, the nasdaq is up 13, and the s&p rose nine. washington bureau chief darren gersh has details on the fed chairman's strong defense of his aggressive policy to support the economy. >> reporter: sure, there are risks when the federal reserve is buying almost $3 billion worth of bonds every day. but chairman ben bernanke told congress basically, "we got this." >> although a long period of low rates could encourage excessive risk taking, and continued close attention to such developments is certainly warranted, to this point, we do not see potential costs to the increased risk- taking in some financial markets is outweighing the benefits of promoting a stronger economic recovery and more rapid job creation. >> reporter: with unemployment stuck around 8% and inflation subdued at 1.5%, there are no economic red lights flashing. so bernanke gave no signals he was ready to change course or back away from his aggressive program to get the economy back to a more normal level of output. still, t
, it's the most popular way to give. and charities can use it right away. but charities who can take stock actually really like appreciated securities because you can sell them right away and turn it into cash. >> tom: is that preferred, though, over just the cold hard cash or the credit card contribution? >> well the credit card contribution is good but the credit card company takes a few percent off the top. so if you think you're giving a hundred dollars on-line, you're really giving $97. if you're giving cash, you can give the full amount. but one of the things about appreciated securities is that donors who give appreciated securities often give larger gifts. so charity's like that and it's pretty inexpensive to sell the security. the other nice thing is the donor gets to deduct the full market value of the gift. so if you pay $10 and just a hundred you get to deduct the $100 and avoid capital gains tax. it's way more gifting of appreciated securities than i think people really know. >> tom: we heard the jingle about donating your car. how about other hard assets like that. >>
, "n.b.r.," washington. . >> chairman of macroeconomic advisers joins us tonight from st. louis. you have been looking at the sequester and fiscal cliff for man moons, joel. a pay cut for hundreds of thousands federal employees april 1. that sounds pretty substantial. is it, to the economy? >> well, first of all, it's substantial to the people affected, no question about that. in terms of its impact on the economy, we recently did a study that suggested if the sequester goes into full effect march 1, want impact will be to knock .6% off of growth this year. that is if we thought the economy was going to grow at about 2.6% without the sequester, that will be reduced to 2% with the sequester. >> tom: for this year, we're talking $85 billion potentially taken out of the growth of government spending between march 1 and the end of september and a $4 trillion budget. proportionally for median household income that's the equivalent of $1,000 out of a $50,000 income being taken out. how can that impact economy so much? >> well, it's-- it amounts to something like an 8% cut in the level of g
by groups opposed to economic reform, on top of that, u.s. equities face a looming friday deadline for massive government budget cuts, known as "sequestration." the dow tumbled 216 points, the nasdaq fell nearly 46, and the s&p 500 lost 28 points. while there's been much talk of a correction in the stock market, sequestration may not be the catalyst. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: it is widely accepted on wall street that sequestration is coming. and, with it a new reason for the fragile u.s. economy to sputter. but, what will the first phase of billions of dollars in federal spending cuts actually do to the u.s. stock market? after all, major market averages are hovering close to all-time highs, and don't forget investors are finally warming up to equities again. floor broker art cashin says today's selling was mostly a reaction to italy's election, and that the stock market is not yet focused on sequestration. >> i don't think that even we slip into sequestration it will have the same dramatic effect that the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling had. it is seen as somewhat temp
saying, "we think our stock is overvalued, let's use it while we can to buy the competition." >> reporter: there may be a lot more corporate marriages in the months ahead, but stovall says the stock market still needs to digest its recent gains. >> i think that we could end up seeing a relatively mild correction in prices, something on the order of 5% or maybe more. but then we're going to see a lot of investors say, "it's time to jump back in because i missed most of this move." >> reporter: stovall also says any stock market correction needs a trigger. what that may be, however, is anyone's guess. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: dell is among those companies involved in the deal- making this year. its founder and a group of investors wants to take dell private. in the meantime, the company reported better than expected quarterly earnings late today. dell earned 40 cents per share last quarter. while that's down considerably from a year ago, it is slightly better than wall street estimates. still, business continues to be tough. the lone business dell saw revenue grow last qua
: president obama also used last night's speech to push for an increase in cyber security. his proposal set the stage for a fresh debate on the urgency for cyber-security. the president made the case that america's power grid, financial institutions and air traffic control systems, are vulnerable to attacks. so he's calling on congress to pass legislation to give the u.s. government the capacity it needs to secure our networks. the president also issued an executive order, to create cyber security standards for u.s. businesses, and for the government to share more information about threats. but cyber security experts, say while that sounds easy, it's hard to do. >> you can't just inform one party necessarily, you might really have an obligation as a government to inform every player in a sector, and then of course that's a high bar, because you're sharing the information with a lot of people which increases the likelihood that it might get out back into the wrong hands. >> susie: beckstrom says the threat of cyber attack or manipulation to critical infrastructure like the power grid and tra
following a tough recession. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: joe davis joins us now, he's chief economist at vanguard, the giant mutual fund company. >> susie: joe, nice to have you with us on this important day. let me start by asking you, do you think the fed is taking on too much risk? >> i think there is an argument that can be made. we've had a concern for more than a year that there are both costs as well as benefits with respect to very aggressive monetary policy. and just some of the behavior we've seen in the financial markets. i know the report talked about excessive risk-taking. so i've had a concern that those costs associated with monetary policy may not have been given the sort of credence they should have been. so a positive development, in my mind, to today's minutes it was that federal reserve policy-makers were more aggressively talking about both the pros and cons wreaptwith respect to aggressive monetary policy. >> susie: one thing we've been hearing repeatedly from the federal reserve is they're not going to make any change in this policy, raising in
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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